Facebook and American Democracy

The Atlantic has a good article on What Facebook Did to American Democracy by Alexis C. Madrigal (Oct. 12, 2017).  What is interesting is how we assumed that the net and social media could affect things and that is would naturally benefit the left.

The research showed that a small design change by Facebook could have electoral repercussions, especially with America’s electoral-college format in which a few hotly contested states have a disproportionate impact on the national outcome. And the pro-liberal effect it implied became enshrined as an axiom of how campaign staffers, reporters, and academics viewed social media.

The story of networked politics seems to be that of tactics being developed by the left and promoted as democratizing and inclusive that are then reused by the right. It is also the story of how Facebook decided to own news and fake news. They created filter bubbles so that none of knew what the other was thinking.

An important article. Read.

BuzzFeed on Breitbart courting the alt-right

Screen of emails from Dan Lyons

Buzzfeed News has an article on Here’s How Breitbart and Milo Smuggled Nazi and White Nationalist Ideas Into The Mainstream. The article in based on a cache of internal Breitbart emails and mostly deals with what Milo Yiannopoulos was up to.

From this motley chorus of suburban parents, journalists, tech leaders, and conservative intellectuals, Yiannopoulos’s function within Breitbart and his value to Bannon becomes clear. He was a powerful magnet, able to attract the cultural resentment of an enormously diverse coalition and process it into an urgent narrative about the way liberals imperiled America. It was no wonder Bannon wanted to groom Yiannopoulos for media infamy: The bigger the magnet got, the more ammunition it attracted.

Part of the story also deals with some “liberal” journalists who apparently were emailing Milo like Dan Lyons. It just get more and more sordid.

Many of those who wrote Milo seem to be disgruntled people who feel oppressed by the “political correctness” of their situation, whether in a tech company or entertainment business. They email Milo to vent or pass tips or just get sympathy.

Inauguration of a new degree at Bologna

From Humanist I found out that the University of Bologna, one of the oldest universities in the world, is inaugurating a degree in Digital Humanities and Digital Knowledge (DHDK). The official web site for the two year MA is here. The programme will be in English and the Programme Director is Dr. Francesca Tomasi.

I love the idea of an inauguration of a programme. From the programme of the inauguration, it looks like a nice set of events/talks too.

Congratulations to Bologna!

Canadian Social Knowledge Institute

I just got an email announcing the soft launch of the Canadian Social Knowledge Institute (C-SKI). This institute grew out of the Electronic Textual Culture Lab and the INKE project. Part of C-SKI is a Open Scholarship Policy Observatory which has a number of partners through INKE.

The Canadian Social Knowledge Institute (C-SKI) actively engages issues related to networked open social scholarship: creating and disseminating research and research technologies in ways that are accessible and significant to a broad audience that includes specialists and active non-specialists. Representing, coordinating, and supporting the work of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership, C-SKI activities include awareness raising, knowledge mobilization, training, public engagement, scholarly communication, and pertinent research and development on local, national, and international levels. Originated in 2015, C-SKI is located in the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab in the Digital Scholarship Centre at UVic.

Skinner on his Teaching Machine and programmed learning

From Teaching in a Digital Age by A. W. Bates I came across this 1954 video of Skinner explaining his Teaching Machine inspired by behaviourism. The machine runs a paper script, but it isn’t that different from the computer based drill training today. You get a question, you write your answer, and you get feedback.

Later we got machines that projected slides and hypertext systems. See Programmed Instruction and Teaching Machines.

Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities

Wired Magazine has a nice essay on Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities. The essay by a computer scientist argues that CS students need to study the ethical and social implications of what they build. It can’t be left to others because then it will be too late. Further, CS students should be scared a little:

Professors need to scare their students, to make them feel they’ve been given the skills not just to get rich but to wreck lives; they need to humble them, to make them realize that however good they might be at math, there’s still so much they don’t know.

Replaying Japan 2017

Geoffrey Rockwell at Arcade Cabinet
Playing Missile Command at the Strong (Photo by Okabe)

Last week I was at the 5th International Conference on Japan Game Studies, Replaying Japan 2017. You can see my conference notes here. The conference was held in the Strong Museum of Play which has a terrific video game collection and exhibit. (I vote for holding all conferences in museums!)

Continue reading Replaying Japan 2017

Conference Report: DH 2017

This year I kept notes about the Digital Humanities 2017 conference at McGill. See DH 2017 Conference Report. My conference report also covers the New Scholars Symposium that took place before.

The NSS is supported by CHCI and centerNet. KIAS provided administrative support and the ACH provided coffee and snacks on the day of. We were lucky to have so many groups supporting the NSS which in turn supports new scholars to come to the conference and to articulate their issues in an unconference format.

DH 2017 itself was a rich feast of ideas. There was too much going on to summarize in a paragraph, but here are two highlights:

  • We had an opening keynote in French from Marin Dacos. He talked about the “Unexpected Reader” that one gets when publications are open.
  • We had a great closing keynote by Elizabeth Guffey on “The Upside-Down Politics of Access in the Digital Age” that asked about access for disabled people in the digital realm.

The participants of the New Scholars Symposium identified the following as topics to watch and think about:

  • AI and Machine Learning
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Building Twitterbots
  • Training Opportunities
  • Pedagogy
  • Digital Collections and Copyright
  • Diverse Voices

Alice and Bob: the World’s Most Famous Cryptocouple

Alice and Bob is a web site and paper by Quinn DuPont and Alana Cattapan that nicely tells the history of the famous virtual couple used to explain cryptology.

While Alice, Bob, and their extended family were originally used to explain how public key cryptography works, they have since become widely used across other science and engineering domains. Their influence continues to grow outside of academia as well: Alice and Bob are now a part of geek lore, and subject to narratives and visual depictions that combine pedagogy with in-jokes, often reflecting of the sexist and heteronormative environments in which they were born and continue to be used. More than just the world’s most famous cryptographic couple, Alice and Bob have become an archetype of digital exchange, and a lens through which to view broader digital culture.

The web site provides a timeline going back to 1978. The history is then explained more fully in the full paper (PDF). They end by talking about the gendered history of cryptography. They mention other examples where images of women serve as standard test images like the image of Lena from Playboy.

The design of the site nicely shows how a paper can be remediated as an interactive web site. It isn’t that fancy, but you can navigate the timeline and follow links to get a sense of this “couple”.

Secretary Clinton’s Email (Source: Wikileaks)

Thanks to Sarah I was led to a nice custom set of visualizations by Salahub and Oldford of Secretary Clinton’s Email (Source: Wikileaks)The visualizations are discussed in a paper titled Interactive Filter and Display of Hillary Clinton’s Emails: A Cautionary Tale of Metadata. Here is how the article concludes.

Finally, this is a cautionary tale. The collection and storage of metadata from any individual in our society should be of concern to all of us. While it is possible to discern patterns from several sources, it is also far too easy to construct a false narrative, particularly one that fits an already held point of view. As analysts, we fall prey to our cognitive biases. Interactive filter and display of metadata from a large corpus of communications add another tool to an already powerful analytic arsenal. As with any other powerful tool it needs to be used with caution.

Their cautionary tale touches on the value of metadata. After the Snowden revelations government officials like Dianne Feinstein have tried to reassure us that mining metadata shouldn’t be a concern because it isn’t content. Research like this shows what can be inferred from metadata.